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How to Collect Digital Marketing Data in 5 Easy Steps

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Data insights will enable you to create innovative solutions, allowing you to achieve your goals — and then some.
In today’s world, data is one of the most precious resources. The more information you collect about your customers or partners, the better services you can offer them. But, how exactly do you go about collecting data? Do you just ask them? Perhaps, for some basic info. But the best and easiest way to collect digital marketing data is to make the most out of the Internet! 
Related: Why data is the world’s most valuable resource today
Before you even begin collecting data, determine what kind of data you want and for what purpose. What are your goals and what do you wish to accomplish after you accumulate the data? Answering these questions will, in turn, help you to decide what data you should focus on collecting. 
For example, if your business is an online store dedicated to selling products for women, you’ll want to know just which of these products sell well in a given age group and which do not. This info will be helpful while planning and predicting future gains. It will also help you analyze what sort of products your customers are looking for and what types you should perhaps ultimately stop selling. 
Another example — if you are looking for a particular type of audience to market your product to, you’ll need to collect information about the average person who has been regularly buying that product. Remember that establishing a clear goal behind the data collection leads to satisfactory results.
When setting early plans for your data collection project, always remember to establish a clear timeframe. Whether that timeframe will be short or long should depend on what types of data you wish to collect. 
For example, it would be best to set up a lengthy time frame (the same is also valid for web page visitors’ data) where you would collect the data continuously or over a few separate timeframes. 
If you need more data for a specific marketing campaign, it will be better to opt for a shorter time frame over a defined time. Remember to carefully schedule when the data collecting period starts and when it ends. The time frame of data collection is critical, so always think twice before finally opting for one.
Now that you’ve decided on the basics, it’s time to choose a collection method. To do this, consider the choices you’ve made so far and the established intent of data collection. 
You have many options to choose from here; surveys, for example, allow you to ask your customer for info straight away. Some of the most important and widely chosen alternatives are, in turn, online tracking and transactional data analysis. It is best to use the former when gathering primary data on what sort of people usually visit your webpage, how long they stay, what they find interesting, etc. Your hosting provider can collect this data, which you can then request for them to share it with you. 
Transactional data analysis will be a better choice if you’re managing a web store, for instance. It will give you info on how many of your products sell, which ones are most popular and who buys them. 
If you’ve completed the previous steps, we can safely say that you have fully finalized the plan. Now it’s time to implement it and see how it works. Once you have crafted the plan, make sure to stick to it no matter what. 
You can store and analyze your data in the DMP. In addition, you can create a schedule, which will allow you to check at any moment how things are proceeding and whether everything is going according to the plan. This would be extremely useful if you opted for a continuous method of data collection.
And, remember — just because you shouldn’t abandon your plan altogether doesn’t mean that you can’t make changes and update it as the conditions change. This is highly recommended!
After a while, you should collect enough data to make good use of your findings. In that case, it’s time to analyze and organize them! This part of the process is crucial, as it will allow you to turn raw data into valuable insights. You’ll also be able to enhance the marketing strategies you’ve used thus far and change the direction of your business.  
Thanks to those insights, you will improve the quality of your services and offer even better products to your customers. Plus, you’ll have a higher chance of attracting important clients that will help to make your company grow. 
Feel free to use the analytics tool built into your DMP. Once you’ve figured out the patterns of what makes a product stand out from all the other ones, implement your findings as soon as you can to make your business stronger!
Related: How to Use Real-Time Data to Fine-Tune Your Business Decisions
There are various types of data collection methods you can choose from. Following are the most important ones. Remember, each pick has its pros and cons, so choose wisely.
Surveys — great for acquiring data from the customers themselves. It consists of a list of queries, and the respondents can either choose from a variety of options or answer using their own words. One of the cheapest and easiest methods of data collection.
Online tracking — this method can be a good choice if you wish to analyze the behavior of the users regularly visiting your webpage. By placing pixels, you can follow them all over their journey on your platform. This method allows you to access data about your visitors, as well as track their preferences.
Transactional Data Tracking — want to know which of your products are popular among your customers? Then this method is the right one for you. You’ll get the info on which products sell well, which do not and how often people purchase from you.
Online Marketing Analysis — This data collection method is excellent if you wish to analyze your marketing campaign. You can manage the software you used to place ads to tell you all about the users who clicked them, when they did it, what device they used, how long they stayed on your page, etc.
Collecting Subscription Data — activating the Newsletter might be one of the best methods of data collection. You can also request additional information from the people who wish to join the partner program you offer. Not only is this method one of the more basic ones, but it also creates high-quality leads!
Related: The Insane Amounts of Data We’re Using Every Minute (Infographic)
There are various methods of data collection available for you to choose from. Though guides like these can be beneficial, the road to successful data collection should be uniquely yours to discover and specific to your business needs and goals. 
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What Are Content Managers, and How Do You Become One?

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Written by Kayla Carmicheal
Content managers build a company’s content strategy, create targeted and relevant content, and distribute marketing communications to audiences online. They are organized, well-versed in fostering a brand voice, and often know their way around a blog post.
You might just be learning about the content management role and want to know the basics. Or, maybe you know this is the job for you, but want to make sure you’re prepared to be successful.
Below, you’ll find everything you need to know about content managers, from what they do to how to become one. Let’s take a look.
A content manager oversees the development, distribution, and strategic efforts of creating messaging to inform and delight audiences. This role usually involves knowledge of digital marketing software, tools, and methods with a focus on content and SEO. The role also requires people and project management skills.
Content managers develop and distribute timely, relevant content for audiences. To do that, they have a deep understanding of their company’s brand voice and use it to communicate with customers.
In addition to creativity, being a content manager usually involves the management of projects and a content team. They also might collaborate across other teams for projects.
This role is not entry-level — content managers are generally expected to lead their team and foster growth, so it’s a job that’s filled by someone with a couple of years of experience in marketing, communications, and project management.
That was just an overview of content managers and the job role. Next, we’re going to talk about some specific duties of a content manager.
Content managers have varied roles depending on the industry or company they work for, but generally, they develop content topics and campaigns for their company, which are then distributed over the company’s website and social media profiles. They also have a hand on editorial work and are responsible for driving engagement and traffic through their projects.
The role of a content manager can depend on company structure and size. For instance, a startup’s content manager might be their only marketer, while an enterprise company might have content managers assigned to multiple teams.
You might find a content manager taking the ownership over an editorial calendar, developing content topic strategy, compiling data reports, managing social media accounts, or writing long-form editorial pieces.
Alicia Collins, Global Brand Marketing Manager at HubSpot, says, “Content managers wear many hats. Their job consists of so many moving parts — managing blogs, managing social, managing offers … in some cases, they can be a one-person marketing team.”
Even so, there are common responsibilities that define a content manager. Let’s take a close look.
The responsibilities of a content manager include:
What sorts of skills do you need to carry out these responsibilities? We’ll dive into more detail up next.
So, you know what a content manager does. What about some of the skills you’ll need to exceed as one?
Content managers are brand advocates and know that the way stories are delivered reflect their company’s brand and audience preferences. We’ve lightly touched on a few of the skills you need to be a content manager, including creativity, writing, data interpretation, and organization.
But it’s also imperative to have working knowledge of a few other things.
Content managers need to have a general understanding of SEO. That way, you can effectively reach audiences through organic search. In addition, you’ll also have to know how to be a storyteller using the voice of a brand, and how to connect with customers using that brand voice.
Take it from Senior Podcast Producer Matt Brown, who says, “Empathizing with your audience and telling a story worth listening to is always the greatest skill a content manager should have.”
In order to deliver those stories, you’ll need to be familiar with copywriting and editing. Writing skills would be applied to writing marketing communications and blog posts. You’d also use them when editing the work of others.
If you’re worried about the grammar and comprehension front when it comes to writing, check out Hemingway Editor or Grammarly. Hemingway Editor is a free website that checks your writing for technical errors and readability, while Grammarly is software that analyzes your work, spell-checks it, and offers suggestions on how to improve sentence structure.
As a content manager, you’ll spend some time analyzing datasets. Data from past campaigns, SEO research, and audience behavior are all helpful numbers to look at in order to execute job functions, because they inform leadership decisions and collaborative projects.
If you don’t analyze the results from your content performance, you won’t know if your messages are accurately connecting with your customers.
By no means do you need to be a code whiz to become a content manager, but knowing some HTML and CSS can help you jump in when you don’t have a web developer on hand. As a content manager, you’ll be tinkering around with your website’s content management system. That may sometimes necessitate inserting a line or two of HTML and CSS code.
On that note, you should know your way around popular content management systems such as CMS Hub and WordPress. You’ll be directly editing the content on your company’s website, so you’ll want to know how to use a CMS.
CMS Hub offers a 14-day trial that can help you get acquainted with a top-of-the-line content management system in an intuitive drag-and-drop environment. Once you learn CMS Hub, you can try your hand at a more complicated system such as WordPress.
You’ll also want to know your way around a few other tools. Generally, knowledge of one or two marketing tools for every facet of content production and management will cover your bases. This includes programs to enhance content as well, such as automatic grammar check software or graphic design tools.
It’s also a good idea to know about how social media is used as a business tool, and when that applies to marketing campaigns for your company. To help with social media management, knowing how to use a tool like HubSpot would be beneficial.
As a content manager, you’ll spend ample time strategizing how to deliver targeted messages to your audience. That means you won’t throw out messaging willy-nilly, but very carefully and strategically craft the messaging’s wording and timing.
Justin Champion, Principal Product Manager at HubSpot, says, “An effective content manager needs to have a vision of what story they’re trying to tell. This will help them create a cross-platform content strategy that will give the best experience possible to their audience.”
As a content manager, you’ll be handling various content calendars and juggling a wide variety of responsibilities. That makes organization and time management skills a top quality of the best content managers out there.
Luckily, you don’t have to be innately organized or a strict time-keeper. You can use project management apps to keep everything going along smoothly. Remember, as a content manager, you’ll likely be the leader of a team and the go-to person for status reports. As such, you’ll want to be as organized as possible. That way, you’ll have access to the information you need when you need it.
A good content manager has some leadership skills under their belt — but this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need to be an extrovert speaking at the front of the room. You can be a leader by keeping the content management projects progressing smoothly, sending reports before higher-ups ask for them, and launching new campaigns to keep your company top-of-mind for leads and customers.
In some cases, you may need to manage a team of content coordinators or writers. That’s where more traditional leadership skills come in, such as being a great people manager and adopting a leadership style that helps your team grow. Pay close attention to the wording in any job listing for a content manager. You could be the only person in your team or the leader in your team.
So, you know what it takes to be a content manager. But how do you get there? Time to find out.
No matter your background or years of experience, if you’re shifting from another career into content management, you’ll want to re-learn the ropes of content marketing to ensure you’re up-to-date. Take a course to help you strengthen your content marketing skills. I recommend starting with our certification course. Upon completion, you’ll get a certificate that verifies your comprehension of content marketing (plus, you can add it to your LinkedIn profile).
At countless firms, content marketing is synonymous with SEO, so you’ll want to have a firm grasp of the concept as you seek a content manager role. If you don’t know the rules of SEO, you might write content that’s not appropriately targeted or that doesn’t serve a purpose other than filling up your company’s blog.
You’ll need to know how to carry out keyword research and use the appropriate software to find “green space” for your company’s website. Green space refers to keywords with low competition and high potential for serving your audience’s needs.
There’s no better way to start content management than by building a personal website with content that you uploaded and wrote yourself. This website could be for your own personal brand, for a company idea you’ve had for a while, or simply for fun. Whatever it is that you create, you want to get familiar with creating a website from start to finish, so that when it’s time to manage your future employer’s site, you can do it easily.
You’ll learn a few things through this process, including how to upload content and media, how to manage that content once it’s been uploaded, and how to effectively structure your site. It’ll also teach you how to get around a content management system.
Use your learnings from this process to give thoughtful answers to your interviewers when you’re applying for content management roles.
It’s time to search for a role. Unfortunately, content management is a mid-level role, meaning that most content managers have been in the marketing industry for a few years. If you’re just now getting started with marketing, you’ll want to start with an entry-level role first, then move up into content management.
Not all marketing roles are created equal. Look for the following words in the job posting to ensure you’re starting on the right foot:
If the job posting seems too general or if it seems to concern more traditional marketing methods, such as live event marketing or advertising, you’ll want to avoid it. Content managers work almost exclusively on the digital side of marketing.
In your entry-level role, you’ll want to take on the duties of a content manager without yet being a content manager by name. For instance, if your team is missing a content calendar, could you volunteer to create one (without stepping on anyone’s toes)? What about volunteering to upload the week’s new content onto the CMS?
It’s important to continue expanding your technical and practical content management skill set as you gear up to apply to an actual content manager role.
Once you have enough experience under your belt, it’s time to move into content management — either by becoming the manager of a content team or taking on more strategic roles within a marketing team.
Remember to use every piece of experience you’ve gathered thus far to show how well you can communicate with an audience and how well you’ve distributed content in the past. Lead with the results of your actions and measure them in numbers. Content reach, organic traffic, and other engagement metrics are just a few data points you can use to show how effective you can be as a content manager.
If you’re looking to become a content manager, it’s critical to deepen your knowledge of content marketing and SEO. Refining your skill set ensures that you’re staying up-to-date as the industry changes. This is a must for content managers. If you don’t know how the industry is changing, you won’t be able to effectively connect to your audience — and connecting to your audience is what will make you an excellent content manager.
Editor’s note: This post was originally published in April 2020 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.

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Originally published Oct 19, 2021 1:45:00 PM, updated October 19 2021
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7 Simple Digital Marketing Hacks for 2022

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Written by David Brown
Digital marketing trends are changing constantly. Each year brings new marketing strategies that need to be identified and integrated into the gameplans of large and small businesses alike, otherwise, there’s serious money left on the table.
When it comes to online search, Google is way ahead of the competition, being responsible for 94% of total organic traffic and 96% of all smartphone search traffic. This makes getting your business on the first page of Google the single most important factor for your digital marketing success.
The good news is that when it comes to Google’s search engine algorithm, it doesn’t matter if you are a large or small organization. Only those who use the techniques that have been approved by Google get to see their website on Google’s prime real estate — the first page of the search engine results page (SERP).
Let’s take a look at some simple hacks that digital marketers use to make sure their websites rank higher on SERPs and get the most from their traffic.
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Email has been around for years, but it’s not going anywhere just yet. Roughly 80% of marketers have reported an increase in email engagement over the past twelve months.
Another exciting statistic for all those who are thinking of using more emails in their marketing campaigns is that email marketing has the highest return on investment for small businesses. Of course, that’s only going to be possible with a well-crafted email that has concise copy and an engaging message.
One of the most effective marketing tools is the ability to segment your email marketing strategy to match your customer base. For example, marketers constantly use the holiday season to offer incentives to their customers, like discount codes for those who left their website with an item in the shopping cart.
AIDA stands for Attention, Interest, Desire, and Action. Here’s a description from Lucidchart to show how it can be used in marketing.
AIDA marketing model visual explanation
This marketing strategy has been around for a while — since 1898, to be exact. And guess what? It still works.
In fact, AIDA works extremely well on almost all marketing channels to grab the reader’s attention, create a sense of want, pull on their heartstrings, and provide them with a solution to their problem. This proven formula has been used in the past, is still being used today, and should definitely be used when marketing a small business in the year ahead.
Video has grown into a driving force for digital marketing, and this trend doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. In fact, according to research, videos will account for nearly 82% of consumer internet traffic by 2021.
Live and branded videos are two of the most popular trends in video marketing at the moment, and people are continuing to find new and interesting ways to engage their audience with video content.
The beauty of using live video is that it’s interactive and allows the audience to be part of the conversation by calling in or leaving a comment that can be answered during the live session. It’s estimated that by 2021, live video will account for 13% of all video traffic, which makes it an excellent strategy for businesses that are constantly thinking outside of the box.
Contrary to popular belief, creating an explainer, how-to, or product description video does not cost you an arm and a leg. All you have to do is invest in a good camera and microphone, or you can even use your smartphone. Rather than spending large amounts of money on expensive editing tools, you can use apps that are powerful enough to create a professional-looking video.
To generate more search traffic for your website, remember to make it well-thought-out, contain informational content, and address a defined problem that your ideal customer is facing.
Optimizing the video on YouTube with relevant keywords will increase the chances of your video getting more views. And, pay extra attention to the video’s title — it should sound unique and engaging. For example, “Learn how to tie a bow tie” does not sound as good as “Learn how to tie the perfect bow tie.”
While there may be many videos on a similar subject matter, the idea is to make your content stand out from the rest.
The content that you put out will act as currency for your marketing strategies. While creating the usual blogs and articles is good for generating traffic, simply writing content that informs your audience just won’t do. More and more businesses are learning the importance of engaging with their audience. In fact, many successful brands are already using content that engages their audience along with content that educates.
One type of content that is growing in popularity is novel content. This is the content that is put alongside the conventional content of blogs, articles, ebooks, and videos. Similar to videos, creating content that engages your audience is also possible via polls, quizzes, and contests, where the audience gets to vote or share their opinions on a particular subject. Try to keep this content relevant to your business.
Expiring content, which seems to have been inspired by the Snapchat model, is also continuing to gain popularity amongst the younger crowd. Expiring content remains on your website or social media for a certain amount of time before being removed. This creates a sense of urgency that can encourage viewers to take action. To entice your audience while using expiring content, you can include a discount code that’s displayed for a limited amount of time before being removed.
Those who are investing in online marketing need to understand the difference between marketing and branding. While these two terms are sometimes used interchangeably, their meanings are very different.
When it comes to the consumer, your brand is not going to be the product or service you provide, but rather the logo, website design, and the message across all platforms that you send to your customers. In other words, branding is how the audience will perceive your business.
On the other hand, digital marketing uses tactics that are designed to reinforce your branding efforts. This means that your marketing efforts should enhance your brand’s message and not have the opposite effect. However, this is where many small businesses fall flat, as they use marketing campaigns that focus more on their product or service instead of building interest and nurturing a community on social media platforms.
Blatantly promoting your product or services on social media will not help you create a community of loyal followers. In fact, it may actually have a negative impact on your brand’s overall appeal to your audience.
LSAs, or local services ads, are similar to Google Ads, but are very different when it comes to their effectiveness in promoting your products or services. In short, LSAs are pay-per-lead ads that have now begun popping up at the top of Google search results. Initially released in 2017, LSAs are slowly gaining ground and rolling out to small markets as well.
Example of Google local services ad
Currently, LSAs seem to focus for home service providers, such as electricians, locksmiths, painters, house cleaning, and plumbers. If you provide any of these services, it’s time you used LSAs to increase your reach. However, there is little doubt that their use is going to spread to other businesses as well.
Unlike Google Ads, you don’t have to pay for clicks, but rather for leads that are relevant to your business.
Here’s how Local Services Ads work:
If you have patience, using LSAs could be useful in generating leads, however, if you are a startup or small business on a shoestring budget, then testing the waters of LSAs might not be for you right now.
Some people say that SEO is dead. We beg to differ. In fact, search engine optimization is more important than ever when it comes to getting your website indexed on Google. While SEO trends continue to change, one area that Google seems to be focusing on is differentiating between search and intent.
For instance, using terms such as “web design Miami” could display web design companies while “web design company in Miami” could start displaying job boards.
Google places snippet example in search
This means that to succeed with your SEO strategy, you need to segment queries that you want to rank for and make competitor analysis a big part of your SEO strategy.
If we’ve learned anything from the past, it’s that when it comes to online marketing, the proven methods of marketing are still around, and keeping your marketing strategy simple really does work.
Tried and tested methods of digital marketing provide small businesses with a guideline of what strategy should be used to improve your digital marketing results. But that being said, these formulas are not written in stone, which means you need to keep on tweaking your digital marketing strategy to get the best ROI.
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Originally published Oct 22, 2021 1:11:06 PM, updated October 22 2021
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Marketing for Startups: A Three-Step Guide to Creating Your Strategy

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Written by Lucy Fuggle
Marketing for your new startup is exciting. You’ve put time and effort into creating your product or service, and now you need to make sure your market is as hyped about it as you are.
In this three-step guide, we’ll cover the essential components for creating asuccessful marketing strategy and help your startup grow faster by capturing the attention of the right people: ideal customers.
Before you start thinking about marketing tactics, you need to build a solid foundation for your brand and messaging. This is a step many startups skip, which, along with a lack of user research and market demand, can be a reason nine out of ten startups fail.
After ensuring there’s demand for your product, get clear on these fundamental questions before planning your marketing strategy:
Who are you helping? Before you start marketing your product, you need to define your target audience. And within your target audience, go further and identify your different buyer personas.
What problems are you helping your customers solve? What are the pain points and challenges that you offer a solution to? Define this thoroughly; getting this one right will determine whether your marketing message resonates with your ideal customer or falls flat.
How are you helping your customers? It’s no coincidence that we’re talking about the how after the who and the what. Starting with the how is a classic startup mistake that will set you up for failure. As tempting as it is to dive into the details of your product, the harsh truth is that nobody will care unless you first answer every prospect’s most important question: “what’s in it for me?”
Once you have the answers to these three questions, it’s much easier to craft compelling marketing messages that effectively resonate with your ideal customers. This provides the framework for any startup’s successful marketing strategy.
Below is our framework for an effective marketing strategy for your startup. Think of it as the foundation you can build upon and add to as you scale, bringing in new tactics such as email nurturing and other marketing automation.
To get your marketing strategy underway, the first thing you need to focus on is optimizing your website.
With great search engine optimization (SEO), landing pages designed for conversions, and a blog to drive traffic and build trust, your website will become a marketing machine in its own right.
Pay attention to SEO at the beginning of your startup’s journey and you’ll reap the rewards later.
Make sure you identify which keywords your prospects are looking for so you can start building your site and your content to rank for them.
Tools like Ahrefs or SEMrush are great for this and can be used both for checking which keywords your competitors use and for auditing and improving your site.
Once a visitor lands on your site, make sure there’s a next step for them to take. Offer something of value to incentivize visitors to leave their contact details.
If you’re stuck on what to offer, a download of a white paper or free trial of your service are classic lead magnets. Once you have their email, you can reach out to prospects and nurture them down your sales funnel with automation and personalization.
Did you know that a B2B buyer on average consumes 13 (!) pieces of content from a provider before deciding to purchase?
To build trust with your prospects, it’s essential to showcase your expertise and build credibility by publishing useful and valuable content on your website.
Guest blogging on other sites is also a cost-efficient way to drive traffic and get exposure.
Once you have your website in good shape, social media is the next arena to conquer. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the sheer number of options, so where should a startup begin?
Where does your target audience like to hang out online? If you target Gen Z kids, then maybe TikTok is the place to be. And if you’re selling a B2B product? Then LinkedIn is probably a better channel.
Choosing your channels thoughtfully with your key personas in mind will help you create more targeted messaging and avoid spending time on channels where ROI is low.
When you’ve chosen your channels and platform, it’s time to consider what to publish. Your guiding star should be to help, not to sell. In social media, people tend to filter out or block anything that feels too salesy.
Aim for content that is either educational, inspiring, or entertaining, depending on your product and your target audience.
There’s a reason social media is called social media. These are not platforms for one-sided communication; one of the keys to success is interaction.
Always respond to questions and comments as soon as you can, and interact with the influencers in your industry to build relationships and awareness for your startup.
Advertising can be tricky to maneuver, so start small to avoid spiraling costs. Start by targeting the most low-hanging fruit and experiment to see what works.
Trial and error is often the best way to go, starting with minimal spending and amping up only when you begin to see real results.
The best marketing you can get is happy clients recommending you to their peers. It’s the type of marketing that is the most trusted, the most effective, and the least costly.
Start building processes for referrals into your funnel from the beginning, such as offering active clients incentives for referring new sign-ups.
Social proof is gold in marketing. Research shows that 91% of people read customer reviews and 84% of people trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations.
Testimonials and case studies are highly effective ways to leverage happy customer stories at scale. And they are well worth the investment. A well-written case study is one of the most influential pieces of marketing content you can produce and can be leveraged in all stages of the sales funnel.
Start early and collect testimonials from happy customers. Then write case studies describing how your product is helping them.
Now that you have a baseline marketing strategy to build off of, let’s talk about how to properly scale it as your business continues to grow.
When building a marketing plan for your startup, be prepared to continually experiment, measure, and iterate.
Traditional marketing campaigns are a dying breed. Today, the most successful businesses are the ones who are continually tweaking and adapting, allocating funds where they get the most bang for their buck.Being agile and adapting is vital.
It’s also important to get your core KPIs in place early on in your startup’s marketing journey. These should be closely aligned with your overall company metrics (and stay that way as your startup scales).
Choose a few important KPIs to focus on and visualize these transparently and accurately in your reporting dashboards. These can include:
To get quality data that informs actionable insights, avoid getting swamped by vanity metrics that don’t matter, sync data between your apps, and create a culture of data integrity at your business for optimal accuracy.
Don’t fall into the sunk cost fallacy trap: you can always pivot away from what’s not working, and often a startup should do just that.
Learn from your experimenting, and make sure to document what you’re doing as well as the money you’re spending on different channels. This way, new hires won’t have to reinvent the wheel, and you’ll be able to track your expenses and measure ROI.
Remember to start by defining who you are helping, what you are helping them with, and how you’re doing it.
When you have your story and messaging in place, it’s time to move on to the channels you use to communicate it: including your website, social media, and customer-generated content such as case studies. And, don’t forget to document your results to keep learning and tracking performance along the way.
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Originally published Oct 22, 2021 1:17:53 PM, updated October 22 2021
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