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How Fox Plans To Win Big With Launch Of ‘Fox Weather’

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Fox Weather meteorologist Stephen Morgan rehearses on the Fox Weather set, at News Corporation … [+] headquarters, in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
Last week, on one of the final days of rehearsals before the launch of Fox Weather, the meteorologists working in the sleek new studio dubbed “America’s Weather Center” began tracking some thunderstorms with the potential to spawn tornadoes. The team went into breaking news mode, and Fox Weather president Sharri Berg liked what she saw. “It was like watching a well-rehearsed ballet,” Berg told me. “Everything worked.”
Berg, who helped launch the Fox News Channel, has hired more than 100 people—including 40 meteorologists, many from local television stations—for Fox Weather, a 24-hour streaming service that debuted Monday. “When we first looked at the different business models—is it a cable channel? Is it an app? It’s all of the above,” Berg said, pointing to the network’s Fox Weather app as the place where consumers will see the power of what she and her team have built. “We saw an opportunity to build an app that was useful, simple to use—and it’s got to be a little entertaining.”
Fox Weather co-anchors and meteorologists Jason Frazer and Britta Merwin rehearse on the Fox Weather … [+] set, at News Corporation headquarters, in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
In an internal memo to Fox News Media staff after Fox Weather made its debut Monday morning, Fox News Media CEO Suzanne Scott said “our team has worked incredibly hard over the last 10 months to launch the now third streaming service within the Fox News Media juggernaut of eight linear, digital and direct-to-consumer platforms…the entire team has worked meticulously to develop a fresh, innovative approach to forecasting…to super serve the loyal audience that we have cultivated over the last 25 years.”
The Fox Weather app for iPhone and Android features a first-of-its-kind immersive live 3D radar that’s exclusive to Fox. Looking at the radar on her phone, Berg demonstrated how a user can zoom in, spin around and explore their local weather. “It’s interactive and engaging, but also useful,” she said. Built on gaming software, the 3D radar feature will also be available on touch screens in the Fox Weather studio.
As co-hosts Jason Frazer and Britta Merwin welcomed viewers for the first time as Fox Weather officially debuted early Monday, it was clear the “America’s Weather Center” studio will be a key feature, with producers at work in the background and plenty of room for the meteorologists to move around. The studio, called Studio W, was once home to Shepard Smith and his over-the-top breaking news set that also had producers and writers at work alongside the anchor.
Fox Weather producer and meteorologist Geoff Bansen, rehearses on the Fox Weather set, at News … [+] Corporation headquarters, in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
The product of extensive consumer research, Fox News Media has high hopes for the new Fox Weather brand, backing it with an investment of more than $10 million, according to the Los Angeles Times. Berg says Fox Weather will complement Fox News, the Fox owned-and-operated television stations, and Fox Sports. The network partnered with WeatherSTEM, a company that has 600 cameras in college and NFL stadiums across the country—an opportunity to provide live weather shots and forecasts for big games.
Fox Weather co-anchor and meteorologist Britta Merwin rehearses on the Fox Weather set, at News … [+] Corporation headquarters, in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
Fox Weather is available online, on the Fox Weather app, and on Fox NOW and the Fox News TV apps. The network is advertiser-supported and, beginning in January, will be available on digital over-the-air channels in cities where Fox owns television stations.

Mark Joyella is a five-time Emmy Award-winning reporter and news anchor who worked at television stations in Miami, Orlando, Tampa and New York City. He’s worked in cable

Mark Joyella is a five-time Emmy Award-winning reporter and news anchor who worked at television stations in Miami, Orlando, Tampa and New York City. He’s worked in cable news at CNN and his writing on politics and media has appeared in Adweek, the New York Post, the Orlando Sentinel, and The Dallas Morning News

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WWE Partners With Fox’s Blockchain Creative Labs In NFT Deal

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WWE is partnering with Fox’s Blockchain Creative Labs in an NFT deal.
WWE has expanded its partnership with Fox FOXA with the announcement of a multi-year deal to launch a Non-Fungible Token (NFT) marketplace. The NFTs will feature licensed collectible items in homage to iconic moments from WWE Superstars at WrestleMania, SummerSlam and other memorable WWE events.
Fox currently airs WWE Friday Night SmackDown amid a massive billion-dollar deal signed in 2019, and through its Blockchain Creative Labs NFT imprint (spawned from a partnership alongside Bento Box Entertainment), Fox’s NFT deal with WWE will feature its first NFTs outside of the Fox umbrella. Blockchain Creative Labs currently manages a $100 million creative fund. In addition to NFTs dedicated to the hit show The Masked Singer, Fox’s forthcoming animated comedy KRAPOPOLIS will become the first animated series to be curated entirely on the blockchain.
“Blockchain Creative Labs has quickly become a leader in the space with an incredible executive team that truly understands the NFT arena and its tremendous potential,” said Scott Zanghellini, WWE Senior Vice President, Revenue Strategy & Development in a press release.
“This new partnership allows us to deepen our relationship with FOX, as we continue to explore new and creative ways to engage our passionate fanbase.”
Fans will be able to use Eluvio’s digital wallet to purchase collectible items using traditional currency or cryptocurrency. WWE continues to see opportunities in the NFT space as it launched its first NFTs earlier this year, which featured The Undertaker. Ahead of SummerSlam season earlier this year, WWE followed up with John Cena NFTs. Both NFT drops were in conjunction with Bitski.
WWE has already seen vast returns by monetizing its history through the WWE Network, which was leased to NBC’s Peacock last year in a billion-dollar deal. With the NFT industry on the rise, part of WWE’s strategy is to connect its countless historic moments—not to mention its nostalgic fanbase—to the sale of NFTs.

I’ve been a pro wrestling columnist and video blogger for a leading national sports website since 2010, and formerly of Bleacher Report, where I was a WWE columnist an

I’ve been a pro wrestling columnist and video blogger for a leading national sports website since 2010, and formerly of Bleacher Report, where I was a WWE columnist an host of the nearly 100-episode digital series WWE WTF. In 2012, I was featured in Bleacher Report’s “Why We Watch” documentary discussing the career of Kurt Angle. I graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara with a major in business economics, an emphasis in accounting and a minor in sports management. 

I’ve been featured multiple times on NPR in addition to appearances on BBC and ESPN Radio. My expertise in pro wrestling includes covering countless WWE and independent wrestling events live, including six WrestleManias. 

I created the Pro Wrestling Bits YouTube channel. Subscribe at bit.ly/deezbits
Follow me on Twitter @ThisIsNasty 

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While Hasbro’s Toys Were Stuck In Transit, Entertainment Properties Saved The Day

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The Hasbro toy company’s Media Studios in Burbank, California. The toy manufacturer’s entertainment … [+] properties were key revenue drivers during the third quarter. (Photo by AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images)
The snarled supply chain cost toymaker Hasbro $100 million in unfilled orders during the third quarter, but the company still was able to increase revenues by 11%, thanks to the strength of its entertainment division.
The third-quarter results are a testament to the wisdom of late CEO Brian Goldner’s diversification strategy. Goldner, who died Oct. 11 after a long battle with cancer, outlined a blueprint for the company designed to transform it from a toy manufacturer to a fully-integrated entertainment, gaming, and consumer products company.
The third quarter results, reported today, with entertainment revenues up 76%, provided the best indication yet that Goldner engineered a winning strategy for the company.
“This is the beginning of the blueprint proving itself out in the world,” said Richard Stoddart, the Hasbro board member who is serving as interim CEO.
Investors apparently agree. The stock jumped more than 5% in pre-market trading after the earnings release, and remained up more than 5% during the first hour after the market opened.
Hasbro beat analysts estimates for earnings, matched revenue estimates, and said it expects full year revenue growth of between 13 to 16%.
Hasbro said it has the toy orders to meet or exceed the high end of that range, but that supply chain issues could depress sales in the fourth quarter.
Goldner, who continued to lead the company up until days before his death, was very much a presence on Hasbro’s earning conference call, with every analyst offering condolences and admiration for the deceased CEO before questioning executives about the financial results and succession plans.
Stoddart was named interim CEO on Oct. 10, when Hasbro announced Goldner was taking medical leave. Goldner died the next day.
Deborah Thomas, Hasbro’s chief financial officer, said Goldner, before he died, was proud of the company’s third quarter results, believing they showed the strength of the unique business model he and the company had created with bold acquisitions of entertainment properties.
Stoddart assured analysts that plans for naming a permanent CEO are “well underway.”
Like its top toy competitor Mattel, Hasbro has used its scale, resources and industry leverage to navigate around the supply chain roadblocks manufacturers are facing this holiday season. But Hasbro presented a slightly more cautious outlook about shipping and supply chain problems than Mattel, which reported its earnings last week.
The $100 million in unfilled third quarters orders caused consumer products revenue to decline by 3%. If those orders had been delivered, revenue in that category would have been up 5%, Thomas reported.
The majority of those missed orders all were delivered during the current fourth quarter, Thomas said. In September, Hasbro shipped the most volume domestically ever in a single month, she said.
Due to the supply chain crisis, Hasbro ended the third with fewer finished goods in inventory than typical and significantly more stuck in transit. Total transit times have nearly doubled, Thomas said, and in certain shipping channels transit times are as much as 50 days longer than pre-pandemic levels.
Like Mattel, Hasbro took steps early to mitigate risk including activating alternate ports in China and the United States and expanding shipping capacity.
Added freight and shipping costs caused Hasbro to raise toy prices. Those higher prices went into effect in most markets in August, and will be fully implemented in the fourth quarter.

I have 20 years experience covering the retail industry, from mega-malls to Main Street shops, and everything in between. I have reported on retail bankruptcies,

I have 20 years experience covering the retail industry, from mega-malls to Main Street shops, and everything in between. I have reported on retail bankruptcies, including Toys R Us and A&P; retail launches and turnarounds, and the phenomenon known as Paramus, N.J., which has more retail square footage per capita than any other suburban zip code in the country. (And no shopping on Sundays!) I previously covered retail for The Record of North Jersey, NorthJersey.com., USA Today, and the USA Today Network, and also reported for The Grand Rapids Press, and the Buffalo Courier-Express. I love covering the retail industry because of how quickly the winners and losers change, and how easy it is for today’s disruptors to become tomorrow’s dinosaurs if they don’t constantly evolve.

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‘The Role That Women Can Play’ In Energy Today—Tips From Top Women At Deloitte

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Woman in energy industry, from Power Magazine, … [+] https://www.powermag.com/women-are-essential-to-a-thriving-power-generation-sector/
The pandemic has caused millions of people, especially women, to rethink their careers. It may have been stimulated by all that time working from home, or the shift to remote work opening up opportunities in any location, or homeschooling their kids for months while schools were closed, or the joy they found in hobbies or side hustles. It’s no wonder that a Bankrate survey found 55% of people say they are looking to change jobs over the next 12 months.
This is especially true among people who want to use their skills and talents to address climate change and/or socio-economic inequities. More opportunities are opening up in these areas than ever before.
There are few industries where this is more evident than in the energy sector.  From the major oil and gas companies like BP and Shell announcing net zero goals, to government agencies and private companies creating new positions, nonprofits gaining more influence, to entrepreneurs birthing new solutions, and the investors stepping up to fund them, there are plenty of new ways to think about your career today.
And more shifts are on the way, as companies, institutions and countries gear up to seize opportunities in the new  U.S. infrastructure bills and to meet commitments made at the big UN Climate Conference known as COP26 starting on November 1.
Various career paths graphic
So, where do you fit in amidst these changes?
What’s the best way to think about a career in energy today – especially as a woman in such a traditionally male-dominated field that’s being completely reinvented?
It may be hard to get your footing or to know exactly where you add value in all the chaos. Since energy companies and utilities cannot close for renovation like a restaurant can, this massive pivot is happening while they keep the power flowing. That makes it both exciting and confusing. It also opens up opportunities.
Kathryn Pavlovsky, head of Deloitte’s Energy, Resources & Industrials practice
As Kathryn Pavlovsky, head of Deloitte’s Energy, Resources and Industrials practice, told me on my Electric Ladies podcast recently, “What I am finding is that the pandemic has motivated women to appreciate their experiences, the contribution that they can make going forward, and whether they are currently in the best position to be driving forward with those.”
She and her colleague on the other side of the energy spectrum, Kristen Sullivan, head of Deloitte’s Sustainability and Supply Chain Compliance, gave valuable insight into how to think about your next career move.
“The ecosystem is evolving.” Here are five advice highlights from these top women:  
·      “What is the role that women can play in particular?”: Pavlovsky asks this provocative question. “Even within energy and on the topics of environmental, social, and governance, what is the role that women can play in particular, in moving forward that agenda and driving earlier results?” Studies have found that women focus on making a difference with their work more than men do. Women leaders want status and power, and also are want their curiosity and their idealism nurtured.
As both Pavlovsky and Sullivan point out, the shift to ESG – the environment, social and governance Pavlovsky referenced – enables women to work in energy and serve their idealism, depending upon how they do it.
Kristen Sullivan, Deloitte
·      Apply your business competency “through a value-enhancing lens”: Sullivan emphasized something that a lot of people forget is the price of entry to a career: you have to be very good at something. Whether it’s finance, or marketing, or information technology, or human resources, or operations, for example, you need a core competency. Identify what you’re good at and then you can shift by “layering on a different perspective, whether it’s climate risk or societal considerations, to be able to deliver on that traditional competence but at such a higher level, and through that value-enhancing lens.”
·      How can you do things differently?:  Think about “what inspires you” and “what you love to do,” Pavlovsky explained, and then “coupling that with your experiences and then your relationship network,” can help you “think about: ‘how can I do things differently?’” I frame it to my coaching clients as putting the puzzle pieces of their skills, talents and experiences together in a new way to achieve their new goals.
(Photo credit should read PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images)
·      Look at options across geographies:  A key shift that Pavlovsky sees in the transition to an ESG-focused economy, and in the energy industry’s “accelerating digital transformation,” is that the energy industry needs new skills. As she put it, “The ecosystem is evolving,” and the need for those new skills opens doors to women and other traditionally under-represented talent, including the option to work remotely.
·      Find people you want to know: There are likely people in your network, no matter how small it may seem, who know someone who knows someone who can give you insight into the new area you want to explore and help you access new opportunities. Ask, ask, ask! Being shy will not get you what you deserve.
Your competency helps you “deliver trust,” as Sullivan framed what Deloitte does, based in the auditor disciplines.
Then, applying the values lens, you can ask, “What higher purpose can we have than applying our skills, our training, our competence to…drive value into the future?”
Listen to Joan’s full interviews on Electric Ladies podcast with Kathryn Pavlovsky here  and with Kristen Sullivan here.

Joan Michelson is a career coach, dynamic public speaker and host of the acclaimed podcast Electric Ladies (formerly known as Green Connections Radio) of fascinating

Joan Michelson is a career coach, dynamic public speaker and host of the acclaimed podcast Electric Ladies (formerly known as Green Connections Radio) of fascinating interviews with women innovators in energy, climate and sustainability. @joanmichelson or electricladiespodcast.com

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